Sightseeing in Skåne

The morning was very sunny, which is of course nice for a vacation. It’s harder for photography though, but then we found a bunch small pasque flowers and things improved immediately. Initially we only got to this spot because my friend wanted to show me the “most photographed tree in Sweden”. I had never seen a picture of it to be honest so I had my doubts, and now that I’ve seen it, I can only surmise that your mileage may vary. If you want a tree silhouette, pick any mountain and a lonely birch on it. If it has to be a pine, visit Kappruskaftet. But still, I’m thankful we visited the tree. Without it, we wouldn’t have found the small pasque flowers!

That pine.
That pine.
Small pasque flowers
Small pasque flowers

Ales stenar

Skåne has a version of Stonehenge, Ales stenar (Ale’s Stones). This was the only place I had picked out beforehand, as I figured this would be my one and only chance to see them. Not to photograph, but just to see. So now, been there, seen it, snapped it.

Ale's Stones
Ale’s Stones. They make a complete ring, so imagine the oval being completed behind me.

Fyledalen

We weren’t done with the beech forest by any means. Our last spot of the day was Fyledalen where the forest floor was covered in anemones (white and yellow). I tried to walk around without stepping on the flowers, but gave up pretty soon – it was a green carpet! My biggest concern really was to avoid getting ticks on my clothes, those nasty bugs carry some diseases I don’t want to have. I’m not inoculated against them because we are spared from that plight up in Härjedalen.

Beech forest in Fyledalen
Beech forest in Fyledalen
Carpet of anemone
Carpet of anemone
Beech trunks a-plenty
Beech trunks a-plenty
Small pasque flowers
Small pasque flowers. They are in full bloom, the flower hangs like this. The one flower facing me is stuck in last year’s withered plant and thus grows wonky.
They look so peaceful
They look so peaceful, but they were swaying like crazy in the wind!
Corydalis cava
Bird-in-a-bush. Seriously. That’s the English name! Corydalis cava, if you want to check it yourself.
thatched roofs
Saw a lot of these thatched roofs

Lämna ett svar

Din e-postadress kommer inte publiceras. Obligatoriska fält är märkta *

Tillbaka till toppen